Updating changes to exchange2016 we are dating

The elimination of the now-aged mechanism marks the conclusion of a modernization process that began more than a decade ago. In the early 1990s, Microsoft built on the work of the Open Software Foundation (OSF) to create RPC as an interprocess communications (IPC) mechanism that underpinned client-server applications such as Outlook and Exchange.Applications that use RPCs don't have to worry about the details of communication across local and remote networks through different protocols because the RPC layer is responsible for this activity.As per Microsoft documentation, the following script can be executed in Exchange Management Shell to upload a large photo to an Exchange mailbox for a single user: $photo = ([Byte[ $(Get-Content -Path "C:\your-photo\file.jpg" -Encoding Byte -Read Count 0)) Set-User Photo -Identity "user’s Display Name" -Picture Data $photo -Confirm:$False Set-User Photo -Identity "user’s Display Name" -Save -Confirm:$False My picture in their Lync 2013 client and check if the new personal photo is already there.Alternatively, you can view the large image in the browser using Exchange Web Services (EWS has to be configured properly).We probably all know these blurry images appearing in Lync 2013 clients during the Lync call.The image distortion results from the difference between the maximum image size that can be stored in the thumbnail Photo attribute in Active Directory (96×96 pixels) and the size of the photo in the Lync call window.

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The elimination of the now-aged mechanism marks the conclusion of a modernization process that began more than a decade ago. In the early 1990s, Microsoft built on the work of the Open Software Foundation (OSF) to create RPC as an interprocess communications (IPC) mechanism that underpinned client-server applications such as Outlook and Exchange.

Applications that use RPCs don't have to worry about the details of communication across local and remote networks through different protocols because the RPC layer is responsible for this activity.

As per Microsoft documentation, the following script can be executed in Exchange Management Shell to upload a large photo to an Exchange mailbox for a single user: $photo = ([Byte[]] $(Get-Content -Path "C:\your-photo\file.jpg" -Encoding Byte -Read Count 0)) Set-User Photo -Identity "user’s Display Name" -Picture Data $photo -Confirm:$False Set-User Photo -Identity "user’s Display Name" -Save -Confirm:$False My picture in their Lync 2013 client and check if the new personal photo is already there.

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updating changes to exchange2016-12updating changes to exchange2016-72

In the previous post, we configured DNS forwarding and the two-way trust relationship.

This means that if admins are currently running Exchange 2013, they have the flexibility to choose when and how to introduce Exchange 2016.

They can choose to set up DAGs and move mailboxes prior to reconfiguring their load balancers to point to Exchange 2016 CAS services.

The most important improvement, however, is that with Exchange 2013/2016 onboard the image sizes don’t have to be limited to 96×96 pixels anymore.

Since administrators are now free to use even the maximum resolution of 648×648 pixels, users’ photographs can now look way better during conversations.

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